The The Effect of Colors and Positional Noise on Reading Performance with Non-words-Part 2

Authors

  • Abdullah Alsalhi Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK; Department of Optometry, Qassim University, Qassim, Saudi Arabia
  • Nadia Northway Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK
  • Glyn Walsh Department of Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK
  • Abd Elaziz Mohamed Elmadina Department of Optometry, Qassim University, Qassim, Saudi Arabia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2021.6014

Keywords:

www, almadina, com

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Reading can be described as a complex cognitive process of decrypting signs to create meaning. Eventually, it is a way of language achievement, communication, and sharing of information and ideas. Changing lighting and color are known to improve visual comfort and the perceptual difficulties that affect reading for those with poor vision.

AIM: The main objectives of the current study were to investigate the effect of changing the wavelengths and color with different levels of positional noise on reading performance with non-word for subjects with best-corrected distant visual acuity (BCVA) equal or better than 6/6.

METHODOLOGY: In a cross-section interventional study, 20 English speakers were asked to read non-words presented in a printed format. The stimuli were black print words in a horizontal arrangement on a matte white card. They were degraded using positional noise produced by random vertical displacements of the letter position below or above the horizontal line on three levels.

RESULTS: Introducing positional noise affected real and non-words recognition differently. The detrimental effects of positional noise with non-words on reading rate were not influenced by changes in wavelengths and color. The long-wavelength reading rate resulted in the lowest performance compared with other wavelengths with all levels of noise.

CONCLUSION: Reading performance is affected by changes in the levels of positional noise. However, the reading rate is not affected by changes in wavelength and color with non-words. The long-wavelength reading rate resulted in the lowest performance compared with other wavelengths and color with all levels of noise.

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Published

2021-04-22

How to Cite

1.
Alsalhi A, Northway N, Walsh G, Elmadina AEM. The The Effect of Colors and Positional Noise on Reading Performance with Non-words-Part 2. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2021 Apr. 22 [cited 2024 Apr. 23];9(B):244-9. Available from: https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/6014