In Vivo Toxicity Study of Ethanolic Extracts of Evolvulus alsinoides & Centella asiatica in Swiss Albino Mice

Authors

  • Mukesh Kumar Yadav Department of Kayachikitsa, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Santosh Kumar Singh Centre of Experimental Medicine & Surgery, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Manish Singh Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Shashank Shekhar Mishra Department of Vikriti Vigyan, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Anurag Kumar Singh Centre of Experimental Medicine & Surgery, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Jyoti Shankar Tripathi Department of Kayachikitsa, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
  • Yamini Bhusan Tripathi Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2019.209

Keywords:

Centella asiatica, Evolvulus alsinoides L., Ethanolic extracts, Sub-acute, Toxicity

Abstract

AIM: We aimed to investigate several parameters after the in vivo acute and sub-acute administration of ethanolic extracts from E. alsinoides & C. asiatica.

METHODS: Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors for in vivo toxicity study guidelines 423 and 407 of Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) were followed for acute and sub-acute toxicity assays respectively. For LD50 evaluation, a single dose of ethanolic extracts of Evolvulus alsinoides L. (EEA) and ethanolic extracts of Centella asiatica (ECA) was orally administered to mice at doses of 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 2000 mg/kg. Then the animals were observed for 72 hours. For acute toxicity evaluation, a single dose of both extracts was orally administered to mice at doses of 300, 600, 1200 and 2000 mg/kg and the animals were observed for 14 days. In the sub-acute study, the extracts were orally administered to mice for 28 days at doses of 300, 600, 1200 and 2000 mg/kg. To assess the toxicological effects, animals were closely observed on general behaviour, clinical signs of toxicity, body weight, food and water intake. At the end of the study, it was performed biochemical and hematological evaluations, as well as histopathological analysis from the following organs: brain, heart, liver, and kidney.

RESULTS: The oral administration of E. alsinoides and C. asiatica ethanolic extracts, i.e. EEA 300, EEA 600, EEA 1200, EEA 2000, ECA 300, ECA 600, ECA 1200 & ECA 2000 mg/kg doses showed no moral toxicity effect in LD50, acute and sub-acute toxicity parameters.

CONCLUSION: In this study, we had found that E. alsinoides & C. asiatica extract at different doses cause no mortality in acute and sub-acute toxicity study. Also, histopathology of kidney, liver, heart, and brain showed no alterations in tissues morphology.

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Published

2019-04-11

How to Cite

1.
Yadav MK, Singh SK, Singh M, Mishra SS, Singh AK, Tripathi JS, Tripathi YB. In Vivo Toxicity Study of Ethanolic Extracts of Evolvulus alsinoides & Centella asiatica in Swiss Albino Mice. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2019 Apr. 11 [cited 2024 Jul. 23];7(7):1071-6. Available from: https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2019.209

Issue

Section

A - Basic Science