Burnout and Work Demands Predict Reduced Job Satisfaction in Health Professionals Working In a Surgery Clinic

Authors

  • Dragan Mijakoski Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Jovanka Karadzinska-Bislimovska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Vera Basarovska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Sasho Stoleski Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Jordan Minov Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.020

Keywords:

burnout, work demands, job satisfaction, multiple regression, mediation, health professionals, surgery clinic

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Burnout syndrome develops in health professionals (HPs) as a result of exposure to chronic emotional and interpersonal workplace stressors. Research demonstrates the links between burnout, work demands, and job satisfaction in hospital HPs.

AIMS: To examine the associations between burnout, work demands and job satisfaction, and to demonstrate the mediation effect of emotional exhaustion on the relationship between work demands and job satisfaction in surgery clinic HPs.

METHODS: Maslach Burnout Inventory was used for assessment of burnout. Work demands and job satisfaction were measured with Hospital Experience Scale and Job Satisfaction Survey, respectively. In order to examine the role of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and work demands, controlling for age, hospital tenure, and unit tenure, a hierarchical multiple regression models were tested for each job satisfaction factor.

RESULTS: Job satisfaction was negatively predicted by emotional exhaustion. Certain types of work demands negatively predicted different factors of job satisfaction. Emotional exhaustion was a significant partial mediator of the relationship between work demands and job satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS: Adequate management of work demands, particularly excessive workload, time pressure, and lack of staff can lead to prevention of burnout and reduced job satisfaction in surgery clinic HPs, and contribute to better quality of patient care.

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Published

2015-02-04

How to Cite

1.
Mijakoski D, Karadzinska-Bislimovska J, Basarovska V, Stoleski S, Minov J. Burnout and Work Demands Predict Reduced Job Satisfaction in Health Professionals Working In a Surgery Clinic. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2015 Feb. 4 [cited 2022 Aug. 14];3(1):166-73. Available from: https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2015.020

Issue

Section

E - Public Health

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