Work Demands-Burnout and Job Engagement-Job Satisfaction Relationships: Teamwork as a Mediator and Moderator

Authors

  • Dragan Mijakoski Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Jovanka Karadzinska-Bislimovska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Vera Basarovska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Jordan Minov Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Sasho Stoleski Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Nada Angeleska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje
  • Aneta Atanasovska Institute for Occupational Health of Republic of Macedonia - Skopje, WHO Collaborating Center, Ga2len Collaborating Center, Skopje

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3889/oamjms.2015.024

Keywords:

Teamwork, work demands, burnout, job engagement, job satisfaction

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined teamwork as mediator and moderator of work demands-burnout and job engagement-job satisfaction relationships in healthcare workers (HCWs) in South-East Europe.

AIM: To assess mediation and moderation effect of teamwork on the relationship between independent (work demands or job engagement) and dependent (burnout or job satisfaction) variables.

METHODS: Work demands, burnout, job engagement, and job satisfaction were measured with Hospital Experience Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, and Job Satisfaction Survey, respectively. Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used for assessment of teamwork. In order to examine role of teamwork as a mediating variable we fit series of regression models for burnout and job satisfaction. We also fit regression models predicting outcome (burnout or job satisfaction) from predictor (work demands or job engagement) and moderator (teamwork) variable.

RESULTS: Teamwork was partial mediator of work demands-burnout relationship and full mediator of job engagement-job satisfaction relationship. We found that only job engagement-job satisfaction relationship was moderated by teamwork.

CONCLUSIONS: Occupational health services should target detection of burnout in HCWs and implementation of organizational interventions in hospitals, taking into account findings that teamwork predicted reduced burnout and higher job satisfaction.

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Published

2015-02-13

How to Cite

1.
Mijakoski D, Karadzinska-Bislimovska J, Basarovska V, Minov J, Stoleski S, Angeleska N, Atanasovska A. Work Demands-Burnout and Job Engagement-Job Satisfaction Relationships: Teamwork as a Mediator and Moderator. Open Access Maced J Med Sci [Internet]. 2015 Feb. 13 [cited 2022 Aug. 14];3(1):176-83. Available from: https://oamjms.eu/index.php/mjms/article/view/oamjms.2015.024

Issue

Section

E - Public Health

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